Navy EOD2 Jordan Stevenson

Mapleton, UT

In 2005, inspired to serve after 9/11, Jordan Stevenson enlisted in the Navy to be an Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) technician.

On December 16, 2011, during his first combat deployment, petty officer second class Stevenson was serving in Sharana, Afghanistan when he was shot above the left eyebrow while on an assault mission with the Army’s 3rd Ranger Battalion. The bullet passed through his helmet, causing him to fall 20 feet from his surveillance position. In addition to his head wound, he sustained severe internal and external injuries and was placed in a medically induced coma before returning stateside to Walter Reed Medical Center.

Once stable, he was transferred to the Palo Alto VA Medical Center where he began rehabilitation, including regaining his speaking and cognitive abilities.  In 2016, Jordan elected to have doctors amputate his right leg below the knee.

Jordan and his wife, Sarah, are parents to Tatom, Tenley, Kayden, and Jett. Jordan coaches track and field at the local high school and is involved with youth sports in his community. Their current house is a two-story home with the bedrooms upstairs, making daily tasks difficult and tedious for Jordan, especially as a parent to four children.

A specially adapted custom HFOT home will allow Jordan to be more involved in the home. “Not having to use the stairs regularly is something that will instantly improve my ability to maintain our home and create more opportunities for me to be active as a father in my children’s day-to-day routine,” says Jordan. The freedom of a mortgage-free lifestyle will reduce stress and give Jordan and Sarah the ability to give back to the community.

Originally from California, Jordan is choosing to build his home in Utah for the family-oriented community and scenic landscape.

Jordan would like HFOT donors and supporters to know he values their service to Veterans. “I believe the support Veterans receive from our communities and supporters is just as important as the service I gave our country. I’m often thanked for my service when I tell my story to supporters. My response is thanking them for their service to us.”

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